The first Slovenian Stroke Club Forum in 2018

The first Slovenian Stroke Club Forum in 2018

Written by Jelka Janša, Slovenian Stroke Support Organisation

On February 12 -13, 2018 the Slovenian Stroke Club Forum took place at the Topolšica Thermal Spa. The first Slovenian forum was launched in the late 90-ties, followed by the positive examples from the Stroke association in the United Kingdom. In Slovenia, since then, each year there will be between two to four forums organised, depending on the content, size and amount of activities within the organisation. After forum being convened by the president of the Slovenian Stroke Support Organisation, a special chair is appointed for each forum.

Forum consist of the presidents from the local stroke clubs and board members. Forum itself supports the operational activities of the organisation, discusses immediate and future plans, liaise clubs’ activities with relevant local institutions and local associations, covers communication with local media, enables local fundraising, supports visits among the clubs. Usually, as an add-on, there would also be a professional lecture on a topic of interest to the forum. This time the topic was the Burden of stroke among stroke survivors and their relatives in Slovenia.

The first Stroke Club Forum in 2018 was convened by Mr. Milan Čuček, the president and Mrs. Tatjana Erjavec, the vice-president of the Slovenian Stroke Support Organisation. The participants, presidents from local clubs and some board members, were discussing and analyzing activities in 2017, and annual and long term plans of the Organisation. Immediate action plans have been targeted toward improvement of the ongoing monthly clubs’ meeting. Further they were exploring ways to increase membership and expanding fundraising capabilities. In addition, there are two activities planned for May 2018; organized events to mark the European Stroke day and promotion of »The Stroke Action Plan«document in Slovenia.
Overall, forum was dynamic, stimulating and allowed plenty of constructive discussion.

 

Slovenian Stroke Club Forum, photo by Združenje bolnikov s cerebrovaskularno boleznijo

Stretchable electronics a ‘game changer’ for stroke recovery treatment

Stretchable electronics a ‘game changer’ for stroke recovery treatment

First published on ScienceDaily

A groundbreaking new wearable designed to be worn on the throat could be a game-changer in the field of stroke rehabilitation.

Developed in the lab of Northwestern University engineering professor John A. Rogers, in partnership with Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, the sensor is the latest in Rogers’ growing portfolio of stretchable electronics that are precise enough for use in advanced medical care and portable enough to be worn outside the hospital, even during extreme exercise. (more…)

Stretchable electronics a ‘game changer’ for stroke recovery treatment

Short kids may have higher future stroke risk

First published on ScienceDaily

Being a short kid is associated with increased risk of having a stroke in adulthood, according to Danish research published in Stroke, an American Heart Association journal.

A prospective study examined data on more than 300,000 Danish schoolchildren — born between 1930-1989 who were examined at ages 7, 10 and 13. Researchers noted that boys and girls who were 2 to 3 inches shorter than average for their age were at increased risk of clot-related (ischemic) stroke in adult men and women and of bleeding stroke in men. (more…)

Stretchable electronics a ‘game changer’ for stroke recovery treatment

Testimonial Exhibition at the World Stroke Congress October 2018

Written by Sarah Belson, published on worldstrokeorganization.blogspot.com

We want to make sure that the voices of people affected by stroke are heard throughout the Congress in an exhibition of stroke survivor, family and caregiver testimonials.

The 11th World Stroke Congress will focus on the latest developments in stroke prevention, acute management and restorative care after stroke. Reducing the burden of stroke on people with lived experience and their family and care givers drives everything the World Stroke Organization does.

In previous years the visibility of people with lived experience of stroke has been promoted through art exhibitions, both physical and online, and a hobbies ebook. (more…)

Stretchable electronics a ‘game changer’ for stroke recovery treatment

Arm exercise improves walking ability after stroke

First published on ScienceDaily

A new study shows that arm exercises may improve walking ability months and even years after having a stroke. The study, the first to test the influence of arm training on post-stroke leg function, is published ahead of print in the Journal of Neurophysiology. It was chosen as an APSselect article for February.

Researchers from the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada, worked with a group of older adults who had had a stroke between 7 months and 17 years prior to the study. The volunteers participated in three 30-minute, moderate-intensity arm cycling training sessions each week for five weeks. (more…)

Stretchable electronics a ‘game changer’ for stroke recovery treatment

Eye could provide ‘window to the brain’ after stroke: Preliminary results suggest strokes also affect the eye

First published on ScienceDaily

Research into curious bright spots in the eyes on stroke patients’ brain images could one day alter the way these individuals are assessed and treated. A team of scientists at the National Institutes of Health found that a chemical routinely given to stroke patients undergoing brain scans can leak into their eyes, highlighting those areas and potentially providing insight into their strokes. The study was published in Neurology.

“We were kind of astounded by this — it’s a very unrecognized phenomenon,” said Richard Leigh, M.D., an assistant clinical investigator at the NIH’s National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the paper’s senior author. “It raises the question of whether there is something we can observe in the eye that would help clinicians evaluate the severity of a stroke and guide us on how best to help patients.” (more…)

Stretchable electronics a ‘game changer’ for stroke recovery treatment

What are the health implications of using botulinum toxin frequently?

Botulinum toxin has been used for almost 30 years to treat spasticity. Out of these experiences it shows that botulinum does not cause long-term side effects. Microscopic examinations showed that no permanent changes have occurred in the nerves or muscles after absorbing Botulinum. After the effect ends, neither the active substance nor its effects on the nerves can be detected. As a calm muscle is usually weaker (think of a leg in a cast), with time a smaller dose of Botulinum toxin is going to be needed, to get the same muscle relaxing effect than before. (more…)

The Stroke Action Plan for Europe draft document coming soon: Stay tuned!

The Stroke Action Plan for Europe draft document coming soon: Stay tuned!

The Stroke Action Plan for Europe draft document will become available for comments on 26th February 2018. It will be posted on a link, initially shared by ESO on their website and Social media accounts.

The link will lead to the whole document, containing texts from all 7 domains. The document will be in form of PDF and open for all comments, once you register and log in.

It will remain available for comments for two full weeks, starting from 27th February 2018.

SAFE will share the link from ESO’s website as soon as it becomes available, and we would like to encourage as many people as possible to get involved and help SAFE and ESO in shaping up recommendations for stroke prevention, treatment and rehabilitation from 2018 to 2035.

Image by pixabay.com

Stretchable electronics a ‘game changer’ for stroke recovery treatment

Too few with stroke of the eye are treated to reduce future stroke

Too few patients with retinal infarction, or loss of blood flow in the eye, are evaluated for stroke risk or seen by a neurologist, putting them at increased risk for another stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians. (more…)

Stretchable electronics a ‘game changer’ for stroke recovery treatment

MIND diet may slow cognitive decline in stroke survivors

A diet created by researchers at Rush University Medical Center may help substantially slow cognitive decline in stroke survivors, according to preliminary research presented on Jan. 25 at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018 in Los Angeles. The findings are significant because stroke survivors are twice as likely to develop dementia compared to the general population.

The diet, known as the MIND diet, is short for Mediterranean-DASH Diet Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay. The diet is a hybrid of the Mediterranean and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets. Both have been found to reduce the risk of cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, heart attack and stroke. (more…)