Brain liquefaction after stroke is toxic to surviving brain

Brain liquefaction after stroke is toxic to surviving brain

First published on ScienceDaily

Scientists have known for years that the brain liquefies after a stroke. If cut off from blood and oxygen for a long enough period, a portion of the brain will die, slowly morphing from a hard, rubbery substance into liquid goop.

Now, researchers at the University of Arizona College of Medicine — Tucson have discovered that this liquefied, dying brain tissue is toxic — and can slowly leak into the remaining healthy portion of the brain, potentially causing harm. The new findings may open the door for developing new treatments to ward off dementia after stroke; they are described in the April 2018 issue of Neurobiology of Disease. (more…)

Brain liquefaction after stroke is toxic to surviving brain

MRI stroke data set released: Brain scans from stroke patients are being downloaded by researchers to test algorithms

First published on ScienceDaily

Brain scans from stroke patients are being downloaded by researchers around the world to test algorithms that can process MRI images

A USC-led team has now compiled, archived and shared one of the largest open-source data sets of brain scans from stroke patients via a study published Feb. 20 in Scientific Data, a Nature journal.

The data set, known as Anatomical Tracings of Lesion After Stroke (ATLAS), is now available for download; researchers around the world are already using the scans to develop and test algorithms that can automatically process MRI images from stroke patients. In the long run, scientists hope to identify biological markers that forecast which patients will respond to various rehabilitation therapies and personalize treatment plans accordingly. (more…)

Brain liquefaction after stroke is toxic to surviving brain

Stroke drug demonstrates safety in clinical trial

First published on ScienceDaily

A preliminary Phase 2 clinical trial has demonstrated that patients with acute ischemic stroke, the most common type of stroke, can safely tolerate high doses of 3K3A-APC, a promising anti-stroke drug invented at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI). The trial results, announced by pharmaceutical company ZZ Biotech, also show that 3K3A-APC substantially reduced hemorrhage volume and hemorrhage incidence in patients.

“These results lay the groundwork for the next steps toward FDA approval,” says John Griffin, PhD, professor at TSRI, whose team invented 3K3A-APC. (more…)

Brain liquefaction after stroke is toxic to surviving brain

Stretchable electronics a ‘game changer’ for stroke recovery treatment

First published on ScienceDaily

A groundbreaking new wearable designed to be worn on the throat could be a game-changer in the field of stroke rehabilitation.

Developed in the lab of Northwestern University engineering professor John A. Rogers, in partnership with Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, the sensor is the latest in Rogers’ growing portfolio of stretchable electronics that are precise enough for use in advanced medical care and portable enough to be worn outside the hospital, even during extreme exercise. (more…)

Brain liquefaction after stroke is toxic to surviving brain

Short kids may have higher future stroke risk

First published on ScienceDaily

Being a short kid is associated with increased risk of having a stroke in adulthood, according to Danish research published in Stroke, an American Heart Association journal.

A prospective study examined data on more than 300,000 Danish schoolchildren — born between 1930-1989 who were examined at ages 7, 10 and 13. Researchers noted that boys and girls who were 2 to 3 inches shorter than average for their age were at increased risk of clot-related (ischemic) stroke in adult men and women and of bleeding stroke in men. (more…)

Brain liquefaction after stroke is toxic to surviving brain

Testimonial Exhibition at the World Stroke Congress October 2018

Written by Sarah Belson, published on worldstrokeorganization.blogspot.com

We want to make sure that the voices of people affected by stroke are heard throughout the Congress in an exhibition of stroke survivor, family and caregiver testimonials.

The 11th World Stroke Congress will focus on the latest developments in stroke prevention, acute management and restorative care after stroke. Reducing the burden of stroke on people with lived experience and their family and care givers drives everything the World Stroke Organization does.

In previous years the visibility of people with lived experience of stroke has been promoted through art exhibitions, both physical and online, and a hobbies ebook. (more…)