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The article first appeared on Irish Heart Foundation website | Author: June Shannon

Air pollution and climate change, those who refuse vaccines and antibiotic resistance also listed among the top ten threats to global health in 2019 by the WHO

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has identified non-communicable diseases which include cardiovascular disease (heart disease and stroke), as one of the top ten threats to global health in 2019.

A noncommunicable disease (NCD) is a chronic medical condition or disease that is not infectious and cannot be transmitted among people.

According to the WHO, non-communicable diseases, such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease, are collectively responsible for more than 70 per cent of all deaths worldwide, or 41 million people. This includes 15 million people dying prematurely, between the ages of 30 and 69.

Non-communicable diseases, such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease, are collectively responsible for more than 70 per cent of all deaths worldwide or 41 million people.

Non-communicable diseases, such as diabetes, cancer and heart disease, are collectively responsible for more than 70 per cent of all deaths worldwide or 41 million people.

“Over 85 per cent of these premature deaths are in low- and middle-income countries. The rise of these diseases has been driven by five major risk factors: tobacco use, physical inactivity, the harmful use of alcohol, unhealthy diets and air pollution. These risk factors also exacerbate mental health issues, that may originate from an early age: half of all mental illness begins by the age of 14, but most cases go undetected and untreated – suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15-19-year-olds,” the WHO stated.

The WHO added that it would work with governments to help them meet the global target of reducing physical inactivity by 15 per cent by 2030.

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In 2016 more than 9,000 people in Ireland lost their lives to cardiovascular disease with almost half dying from heart disease.

Cardiovascular disease includes all diseases of the heart and circulation but most commonly it refers to coronary heart disease (angina, heart attack), stroke and other blood vessel diseases. Other conditions include congenital heart disease, heart valve disease and disease of the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy).

Read the full article here.